Army Showcase: Adamantium_wang’s Heresy-era Death Guard

An article by    Army Showcase The Display Cabinet Warhammer 30k        0

Finishing your own army is core to the Warhammer 40,000 hobby. Every Thursday in our Army Showcase series, Goonhammer contributors take a look at the armies we’ve been collecting for years, and the new ones we’ve just finished – what drew us to them, why we keep building and painting, and how they play on the table. This week our guest author Adamantium_wang talking about his Heresy era Death Guard army.

The player: adamantium_wang
The Codex: Space Marines?
Points: ~2500
Collecting since: July 2016

 

The Past

From Barbarus To Betrayal: The Broken Blades

Being an account of the 153rd Assault Battalion of the XIV Legion Astartes during the years of the Great Betrayal and its subsequent reorganisation into the renegade warband known as the “Broken Blades”. 

 

Preface

 

My Lords,

As requested by the Governor Militant of the Domains of Sladia I present to you this investigation into the origins and history of that scourge of our sector, the renegade Astartes warband known as the ‘Broken Blades’. Although the times of the Great Betrayal are thankfully far behind us we must delve into them to fully understand the machinations of this now uncommon enemy. Their tactics, their operational structure, their equipment, even their strategic goals all have a foundation in those dark and terrifying days. Thanks to unprecedented access to archives and sources ranging from the fortresses of Bakka and Cypra Mundi and even relays to Holy Terra itself I and my small team of colleagues have been able to piece together as complete a picture of the Broken Blades as I believe is possible. May it prove useful to all of those brave souls that strive to keep our Imperium whole. 

I am, as always, your most obedient servant,

 

Kalliandra Elwick

Sladia Secundus, 337.M31

 

*****

I was first introduced to this dumb hobby over a quarter century ago when our well-intentioned parents, unknowing of what they would set in motion, bought Hero Quest and Space Crusade for myself and my brothers. Being the early 90’s these things were revolutionary to us. A 3D board game? With little dudes you can put together and paint? This blew our pre-teen minds, with a ton of games being played over weekends and the sets being treated with a reverence that saw many of the cards and tokens still in our possession to this day.  However, it wasn’t until they bought us the starter set for the Second Edition of Warhammer 40,000 did the rot truly take hold and begin to spread to our circles of friends. 

Mst of the money from my first job as a teenager went into the amazing Codicies that somehow appeared at my local newsagent. With them in hand, and the incredibly broken expansion box Dark Millennium, we took every chance we had to play. But there was one small problem: none of us could afford the miniatures. So games were played using anything and everything that was at hand: green soldiers, cowboys and Indians, Hot Wheels cars and Micromachines, even rubber balls for bigger things like Carnifex. We got as much mileage out of the few minis we could get our hands on in that pre-internet time, with those poor starter set Orks being stand ins for every other thing under the sun. 

As the years and game editions passed and money started to come in, our collections gradually grew, as did our painting and modeling skills. The gaming circle shrank as some of us instead sunk their hard earned cash into more rewarding pursuits such as motorcycles, cars, concerts, music, computers and recreational drugs. But still a core few of us carried on, hooked to this dumb game and dumber universe with the words “sunk costs!” casting a ghostly echo in our minds. 

Sadly, in all that time and across so many games like WHFB, Mordheim, Battlefleet Gothic, Adeptus Titanicus and Necromunda, I have only once had a completely painted army, and that was 1850 points of Ultramarines, half of which painted to a 3 colour minimum for a tournament. A shameful ham. So with the Horus Heresy finally kicking off I decided to go whole hog on an army I’d wanted to do for a while: The Death Guard of the 14th Legion Astartes. I’d use it as an opportunity to challenge myself with materials and techniques I’d never used before and, inspired by not only the incredible ForgeWorld Black Books but also works like “Death of a Rubricist” by Apologist over on the B&C forums, I decided to stretch my fluff bunny wings as well. 

 

The Present

Credit: Adamantium_wang

On the XIV Legion Astartes

Many great volumes have been written on the Legiones Astartes in general and on the XIV Legion in particular and it is from these past works that I draw this brief note. The XIV were generally accustomed to fighting as a single force under the leadership of their Primarch but the needs of the Great Crusade meant that this concentration of force was not always practical or even possible. The vast majority of worlds in the galaxy are utterly hostile to human life and it was often on these planets, which were frequently rich in mineral wealth, that dangerous xenos species would seek to avoid their rightful destruction at the hands of Man. Left unchecked these aliens could conceivably build their strength until they were in a position to threaten nearby Imperial worlds. This state of affairs could not be tolerated.  

The hardiness and resilience of the Emperor’s Space Marines is well known but the XIV were exceptional even by these standards. The Death Guard took a fierce pride in fighting in conditions that would sorely test the capabilities of even the Legiones Astartes and would carry the day against the most dangerous xenoforms in the most hellish of environs. Independently operating groups of Mortarion’s sons would be formed in response to identified threats or requests for assistance and dispatched by the Primarch all over the galaxy. Most commonly these would be battalions of two to ten centuries under the leadership of a Lieutenant Commander. 

These battalions were the smallest elements of the XIV capable of independent operation. They were often assigned a capital ship (or at the very least a light cruiser) with attendant escorts and frequently accompanied by supporting Mechanicum elements. Rare were the times mere human armies would be able to operate or even survive in the theatres the Death Guard were assigned to, but nevertheless auxillia regiments consisting of enhanced Barbarussian troopers or failed Legion aspirants occasionally supported these Astartes battalions. The flotilla would travel to a war zone, perform their mission, and return to the main Legion body upon successful completion. 

As with most units within the Death Guard each battalion was an ad hoc affair with the constituent centuries drawn based upon materiel availability and operational need. Each century originating from the same Great Company was as frequent as it was not, although there was a tendency to have veteran centuries accompany less experienced commands. In this way the lessons of the Legion could be passed from one generation to the next with the newer Astartes carving out their own legends under the watchful eye of the older warriors. In the end the part would return to the whole and all would be better for it. 

This practice would persist from the latter half of the Great Crusade into the black years of the Great Betrayal and right up until the Legion’s fateful final muster in preparation for the Siege of Terra.

The 153rd Assault Battalion

The 153rd was formed shortly after the devastating Dropsite Massacre at Istvaan V. Delays by the martyred loyalist forces at Istvaan III and the heroism of Nathaniel Garro had cost the Warmaster the element of surprise and he was forced to turn the swift stroke of a coup into a grinding, bloody civil war. In order to keep the loyalist forces off balance and to retain the strategic initiative for as long as he could the Warmaster directed his brothers to split off a small measure of their strength to be sent on far ranging and highly destructive raids. In this way the true movement and intent of the traitors would be masked by a deluge of panicked and conflicting reports. The 153rd was one of these raiding forces. 

At its core the 153rd Battalion was comprised of five centuries drawn from three Great Companies: the 92nd Heavy Assault Century under Konstandin Sologon, the 98th Siege Century under Leutrim Skender, the 144th Pathfinders lead by the infamous Caradin Tolon, the 207th Infantry of Saban Quendrim and Lothor Valon’s 33rd Armoured. Command of the battalion was awarded to Enver Bardh, a first generation Barbarussian Astartes formerly of the 92nd.

*****

The army itself has been a kind of a halfway point between an Age of Darkness force and an army of power armoured idiots for 40k. Having only played two (2) games with them issuing their Legion rules before 8th came along and sundered the game systems I was caught in a problem: do I keep building the army as a 30K force despite literally nobody I know playing the game, or run them as Marines in 40K? The former was a dead end, and with Space Marines and their spiky adversaries being a bit lacklustre and the actual Death Guard book making nearly all the models I had unusable, the army went on the back burner as I turned to my Guard.

Now with custom chapters and some incredible bonuses the new Marine books have breathed new life into my long suffering XIV. They absolutely demolished a tough Dark Eldar list my regular opponent has been building over the last year or two which instantly bumped them up to top priority on my painting table. As it stands I’ve got about 2500 points painted but that translates into about 90% of the 2000 point list I’m running. Being able to get some serious firepower out of ranks of Tactical Marines backed up by Terminators and Dreadnoughts has been a dream come true and has given me a great motivation to finish off the last few models and expand on the purple prose I’d been writing. As my brother Spacegoat says, it’s so much easier to paint models for a game you actually play. 

Right now my list consists of a double Battalion with a Vanguard tacked on for an extra CP. Usually when I first build a list I just grab the units I want to run and stick them all into one Battalion. Then I try to maximise the amount of CP I can get on the second pass, with chopping and changing being done to strike a balance between what I’d like to use and what actually fits. The list then goes through a few different iterations as I play some games with it (Vassal is fantastic for trying out units without spending hundreds of dollars on them first) and the fat starts to get trimmed out. Units I like but just aren’t carrying their weight in games get moved to the painting back burner and turn into modeling projects instead of army building (vale my Deredeo and Sicaran Venator, one day you will have more than just a coat of primer).

 

Here’s the most recent version of my list for 40k:

The Broken Blades - 2000 Point Space Marines (Ultramarines)

++ Battalion Detachment +5CP (Imperium – Space Marines)++

+ No Force Org Slot +

**Chapter Selection**: Hungry for Battle, Master Artisans, Ultramarines Successor

Battle-forged CP [3CP]

Detachment CP [5CP]

Relics of the Chapter [-2CP]: 2x Number of extra Relics

+ HQ +

Chapter Master in Cataphractii Armor [-3CP, 99pts]: Storm bolter, Power sword, Warlord (Trait: The Imperium’s Sword), Stratagem: Chapter Master, Stratagem: Exemplar of the Chapter (Trait: Warden of Macragge), Relic: The Burning Blade

Lieutenants [-1CP, 67pts]

. Lieutenant: Master-crafted boltgun, Power maul, Stratagem: Hero of the Chapter (Trait: Adept of the Codex)

+ Troops +

Tactical Squad [82pts]

. 3x Space Marine 

. Space Marine Sergeant: Chainsword, Combi-plasma

. Space Marine w/Special Weapon: Plasma gun

Tactical Squad [70pts]

. 3x Space Marine

. Space Marine Sergeant: Boltgun, Chainsword

. Space Marine w/Heavy Weapon: Heavy bolter

Tactical Squad [80pts]

. 3x Space Marine

. Space Marine Sergeant: Boltgun, Chainsword

. Space Marine w/Heavy Weapon: Missile launcher

+ Heavy Support +

Predator [175pts]: Predator autocannon, Two Lascannons

Relic Leviathan Dreadnought [304pts]: 2x Heavy flamer, 2x Hunter-killer missile, Storm cannon array, Leviathan siege drill: Meltagun

+ Dedicated Transport +

Rhino [69pts]: 2x Storm bolter

Rhino [69pts]: 2x Storm bolter

 

++ Battalion Detachment +5CP (Imperium – Space Marines) ++

+ No Force Org Slot +

**Chapter Selection**: Hungry for Battle, Master Artisans, Ultramarines Successor

Detachment CP [5CP]

+ HQ +

Captain [93pts]: Chainsword, Jump Pack, Bolt pistol, Relic: Teeth of Terra

Librarian [88pts]: 1) Veil of Time, 2) Might of Heroes, Force sword, Boltgun

+ Troops +

Tactical Squad [82pts]

. 3x Space Marine

. Space Marine Sergeant: Chainsword, Combi-plasma

. Space Marine w/Special Weapon: Plasma gun

Tactical Squad [70pts]

. 3x Space Marine

. Space Marine Sergeant: Boltgun, Chainsword

. Space Marine w/Heavy Weapon: Heavy bolter

Tactical Squad [80pts]

. 3x Space Marine

. Space Marine Sergeant: Boltgun, Chainsword

. Space Marine w/Heavy Weapon: Missile launcher

 

++ Vanguard Detachment +1CP (Imperium – Space Marines) ++

+ No Force Org Slot +

**Chapter Selection**: Hungry for Battle, Master Artisans, Ultramarines Successor

Detachment CP [1CP]

+ HQ +

Techmarine [50pts]: Boltgun, Power axe, Relic: Seal of Oath, Servo-arm

+ Elites +

Cataphractii Terminator Squad [189pts]

. Cataphractii Sergeant: Chainfist, Combi-bolter, Grenade harness

. Cataphractii Terminator: Chainfist, Combi-bolter

. 3 x Cataphractii Terminator: Combi-bolter, Power fist

Relic Contemptor Dreadnought [205pts]

. Dreadnought combat weapon, Storm bolter, Kheres assault cannon, Cyclone missile launcher

Vanguard Veteran Squad [128pts]: Jump Pack

. 6 x Space Marine Veteran: Bolt Pistol & Chainsword

. Veteran Sergeant: Bolt pistol, Power fist

++ Total: [117 PL, 8CP, 2,000pts] ++

 

The Models

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Enver Bardh, Lieutenant Commander, 153rd Bn., XIV Legiones Astartes 

Enver Bardh was among the first XIV inductees drawn from Barbarus, having fought as a child in Mortarion’s armies against the horrifying xenos masters of that world. He would go on to serve through the major campaigns of the Great Crusade with a solid but fairly unremarkable record. He was known to be a dependable soldier but not a talented leader of men, and spent the latter half of the Crusade holding the rank of Lieutenant. 

As was common with the Barbarussian members of the XIV he displayed a fanatical dedication to his Primarch, who was revered as the savior of their benighted world. It was this loyalty that spared him from the cull of the Istvaan III Atrocity and it was in this bloody war of fratricide that he found renewed purpose. After helping to spearhead the final breaking of loyalist resistance he was granted command of the reconstituted 92nd Century, formerly under the leadership of the Terran-born loyalist Aturian Griffith. The Albian longsword Griffith wielded was recovered from the shattered ruins of the Choral City and presented to Bardh on his promotion by his surviving traitorous comrades.  

Leading his new command in the crucible of Istvaan V he took part in resisting and then crushing the Salamanders assault on the Urgall Depression. Although victorious, losses to the 92nd were substantial and were it not for the protection offered them by their Cataphractii plate it is debatable if they would have even held against the incendiary rage of the XVIII in the first place. Indeed, both sides were pushed to their breaking point and were it not for the betrayal of the second wave both Legions would have likely utterly destroyed one another. The combi plasma Bardh bears was the ninth weapon he used that day, recovered from the corpse of an Iron Hands veteran as the loyalist landing zones were finally overrun. 

In the interregnum it appears Bardh’s name came up as a candidate to lead one of the raiding elements that were part of the next stage of the war. While there were certainly other officers that had more storied careers or were better leaders of men most of them were either deemed more vital to the planned offensive against the Cyclops Cluster or were broken bodies on one of Istvaan’s scorched battlefields. Bardh was not the best choice for the job but it appears that to Mortarion there was little alternative. 

***

One of my first miniatures for the project, and one that I’m still very pleased by. He’s a Cataphractii Praetor model with a gun from the Terminator Librarian and a helmet and sword from the Grey Knight kits. I ended up having to drill out a fair chunk of him just so I could fit the helmet in, and even then I had to trim down the back of it so it didn’t look like he was leaping out of his armor. As It is I think he shows a surprising amount of movement for what’s essentially a walking tank and it’s one of my favorite models in the range. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Leutrim Skender, 98th Centurion, XIV Legiones Astartes 

Born on the industrial world of Zeta Mundi, Skender was part of an exceptional Legion intake to shore up the catastrophic losses sustained during the harrowing Rangdan Xenocides. Owing to an uncommonly rushed implantation and indoctrination period and being immediately hurled into some of the worst fighting the Great Crusade would ever see barely one in seven of Skender’s cohort would survive the year. Already dour by nature, the experience left him hollow and the subtle alienation that plagued he and other non-Barbarussian Astartes of the XIV turned him into a cold and taciturn individual. 

He displayed an aptitude for heavy weaponry and its application against fortifications and large xenoform constructs and rose surprisingly rapidly through the ranks. After a period seconded to the IV Legion (and some unsubtle suggestions that he remain there) Skender assumed the role of master of the 98th Siege Century. His talent for siege craft earned him grudging respect and his service with Perturabo’s sons and the gleaming augmetics that were the legacy of Rangdan won him the epithet of “the Iron Guard”.

The 98th Century were in the fortunate position of being recently resupplied by the time of the Istvaan Atrocity and most of its members are equipped with the latest Mk IV plate. Several pieces of Skender’s armor have been further reinforced with ablative layers held in place by the nearly ubiquitous molecular bonding studs. Although a newer mark of armor was adopted some old habits die hard and like many in the XIV the older Phobos-pattern bolter was retained as the unit’s standard armament. Although a temperamental and ancient design by the time of the Betrayal the wealth of ammunition and parts for the model helped to simplify the Legion’s supply chain and the higher impulse of the larger calibre round proved particularly advantageous when combating other Astartes.

***

As a way of dipping my toe into the project without committing too much I bought a squad of the awesome plastic Mk IV Marines from the Betrayal at Calth set. The first 5 man test squad appears later on but this guy was the first character I built for the army. I originally envisioned him as just a squad sergeant, but with just enough bling to be something more important if I needed. When GW finally added lieutenants to the Marine army this guy finally found his permanent place on the table. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Deathshroud, Unknown Designation, attached to the 153rd Battalion, XIV Legiones Astartes 

Hand picked by the Primarch Mortarion, the Deathshroud were an elite cadre of warriors equipped with advanced armor and weaponry and primarily acted as bodyguards to the higher echelons of the XIV Legion. Being chosen to enjoy the protection of these deathly silent individuals was considered an honour and a sign of the personal favour of their sire. However as the war ground on the increasingly paranoid Primarch also used these fanatically loyal Astartes as his eyes and ears in the increasingly disparate war zones the Legion was involved in, monitoring the resolve of supposedly steadfast officers and watching for any signs of psychic corruption among the rank and file. As the rebellion spiralled out of all control or reason the corrupting influence of Horus’ allies worked its poison amongst the traitors, and there is evidence that more than one ambitious or unscrupulous officer met his end under the blades of those he thought sworn to protect him. 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Credit: Adamantium_wang

The inclusion of a squad of Deathshroud to act as a personal bodyguard to Commander Bardh was a late decision by Mortarion. So late in fact that the Carrion Crow, the heavy cruiser assigned to the 153rd as flagship, was already in the process of leaving high anchor around Istvaan V when she was suddenly ordered to prepare to take on additional troops. Tracking and verifying the deployment of Deathshroud is fairly problematic as the names of these Astartes are struck from records upon their induction and we are forced to rely upon visual records to identify individuals in a Legion notorious for their lack of personal embellishment. We can however say with a reasonable certainty that anywhere from six to eight warriors were assigned to the 153rd with four of them pictured here. It is also probable that one of these is the fell Tyrus Mourne, whose actions during the Siege of Terra would have long lasting ramifications for his battalion and his Legion. 

***

These guys were incredibly cool to make and so of course they have no actual analogue in the 40k books. I considered using them as actual Deathshroud from the latest Codex but then there was no place for regular Terminators, Havocs or jump troops in the rest of my army so back into the case they went. The smaller than usual squad size is because they can be used as a command squad equivalent in 30k and 4 of them lets themselves and their boss to ride around in a Land Raider.

Also worth noting is that I really didn’t like the farmer scythes they came with and converted them to be more like a falx or a war scythe. I thought it really fit thematically with Mortarion leading the peasants to revolt against their oppressors, with farming implements being converted into weapons for them to bear. Falx are cool, Tartaros armour is cool, wrist mounted chemical throwers are cool.  Makes me even more mad that I can’t use them. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Caradin Tolon, 144th Centurion, XIV Legiones Astartes 

The so-called “Headsman of Barbarus” had already carved out a sinister reputation for himself long before the Great Betrayal. A Barbarussian native, Tolon was born shortly after Mortarion’s arrival and was a member of one of the earliest generations of Astartes to be raised from the world. By this time the influence of the Terran Dusk Raiders was still strong as the Primarch was only just beginning to reshape his legion. Tolon stood apart from his contemporaries by actively seeking tutelage from the older veterans and attempting to incorporate their hard won knowledge and experience into the doctrinal directives laid down by his sire. In doing so he combined the cunning of the warriors of Old Albia with the survivor’s brutality of a Barbarussian and won himself the recognition of his commanders in a series of punishing close quarters actions. He rose to command his own demi-century after seven savage years and was promoted to lead his own century a decade later. 

The 144th was a more specialised century than most others in the XIV, suited as they were to rapid deployment and assault. Most of the line squads were equipped as jump infantry with a preponderance of bikes and speeders as quick and flexible heavy support platforms. Tolon ran his century to primarily perform dangerous pathfinding and reconnaissance in force tasks or to act as a mobile and responsive reserve force. He and his marines roamed the battlefields of the Crusade and frequently engaged vulnerable targets of opportunity with overwhelming force. What opposition could not be destroyed was lured into the main line of advance, a task greatly assisted by Tolon’s reputation. 

During his early service Tolon became enamoured with the ancient Terran doctrine of “total war”. It was his belief that the only morally justifiable way to conduct war was to do so so completely and savagely that the mere thought of resistance would be crushed. He shared fervently his Primarch’s belief in the liberation of mankind from slavery, ignorance and tyranny and was convinced in the value of thousands of lives horrifically spent in war if it meant the sparing of millions through rapid capitulation. He took it upon himself to be the manifestation of the “hard hand of war” and committed atrocities more at home in the annals of the VIII than the XIV. Taking of heads as trophies, burning of population centres with flame and phosphex and the execution of prisoners were all common practice in the 144th. Higher command echelons would frequently turn a blind eye to such practises as they produced results that were desired by the legion. The XIV was not a legion that occupied itself with the building and maintenance of worlds. 

Tolon’s talents would serve him well during the years of the Betrayal. Like nearly all native born legionnaires he was wholly behind his Primarch in all things and had no qualms with the purging of the Legion at Istvaan, viewing the brothers that would not support Mortarion as traitors to the Death Guard and humanity as a whole. It appears that as the rebellion ground onwards and more and more terrible deeds were required of him Tolon lost his moral grounding completely, justifying every kill and casualty as necessary for the overthrow of the tyrant Emperor. Like many of those fortunate enough to have missed the XIV’s final muster, the Siege of Terra shattered these illusions completely and the full magnitude of what his Legion and his Primarch had done proved far too terrible for him to bear. 

***

This guy was my entry into the 30k thread’s Skullapalooza modeling challenge, where we built models and tried to fit as many skulls as you could onto it. I think this dude had a dozen on him all told, from the heads he carried to the markings on his armour. He was to be a Vigilator, and in a spin on a sneaky beeky guy with a sniper rifle I instead built him as a jump troop to allow the squad of assault Marines I had to infiltrate or outflank as needs be. These days he just runs as a lieutenant buffing some Vanguard and looking slick while doing it. 

The model is from the Destroyer set and they wear Mk IV armor reinforced with additional plating on the front. I converted him and a dozen other guys by shaving off excess pistol holsters, drilling out ones of their two pistol hands and replacing them all with chainswords while carefully making sure the tiny little overlapping plate on their wrists didn’t snap off. About 8 months later they improved 30k Destroyers by making them not horrifically overpriced incompetents and actually worth taking. Of course they did. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Konstandin Sologon, 92nd Centurion, XIV Legiones Astartes

A teenage militiaman at the time of the Emperor’s arrival, Sologon survived a late-stage recruitment and turned from a rail-thin, malnourished youth to a hulking slab of muscle and bone. Large even by Astartes standards, he viewed his elevation to the XIV as nothing short of a miracle of his master’s making and lived every second of it as if it were the most precious gift. He quickly found his calling in close assault squads with his strength and resilience matched only by his zeal. 

Sologon was by accounts an uncommonly sanguine individual, his enthusiasm shining brightly in the sea of his dour and direct peers. This earned him a fair amount of acrimony amongst his superiors with his perceived attention seeking and exuberance viewed as running counter to the Legion’s internal culture and saw him passed over for promotion on several occasions. 

In time his veterancy and combat record earned him the right to wear Terminator plate and he was transferred to the 92nd Century. The advanced armor elevated his abilities even further and what foes he could not defeat through strength of arms he would simply crush beneath his charging bulk. A massive power maul became his weapon of choice and he was one of the fortunate first few outside of the Deathshroud to be issued with a suit of Tartaros armor. 

As the inferno of Istvaan faded Bardh needed a reliable and charismatic officer to lead the 92nd after his own promotion and tapped the firebrand veteran for elevation. Perhaps Bardh hoped that his passion and combat experience would help compensate for any deficiency of command but after the Atrocity Sologon’s fire started to dim. It appeared the fratricide had begun to gnaw at Sologon’s conscience and while he served his commander with efficiency and skill others noted the shift in his personality. Like many others of his battalion the Siege of Terra proved to be his breaking point and he became little more than a hollow husk of a man who simply killed without joy, zeal, anger or malice.

***

Not gonna lie, I fucking love this model. The Tartaros Praetor, with his double handed paragon blade replaced with a thunder hammer and his pauldrons and helmet from the spare Deathshroud model I didn’t assemble. I don’t think I’ll use him as often as his Cataphractii counterpart now that thunder hammers are so incredibly expensive, sadly. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Cataphractii Terminator Squad Tybal of the 92nd Century

I’m one of those idiots that love Terminators and try to fit some into every army I can. The first metal miniature I ever bought was a Terminator with an assault cannon to back up the handful of doofy looking Space Hulk plastics I’d acquired and I adored him. The Heresy introduced two new (old?) types of Terminator armour and by God Cataphractii was everything I hoped it would be. These are the plastics released with Betrayal At Calth and I geared them up in classic style, with power and chain fists all around. I’ve got another set of resin ones I’m going to do with combi bolter and lightning claw to go with them. Not exactly optimal, but they look incredible. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Veteran Squad Leidon of the 92nd Century

A squad of Mk II veterans, half of which are magnetized to take advantage of the ludicrous rules they get in 30k. Even though the Forgeworld resin models tend to be a bit thin when it comes to legs I absolutely love the segmented armor on them. These guys have been around for decades and for them the original is still the best. Worth pointing out I’ve gone and ensured that as many weapons as I can are the same style throughout the army, with Phobos-pattern bolt weapons and Thunder Edge chainswords everywhere they can go. No, I don’t have a problem. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Tactical Squad Kord of the 92nd Century

The first 15 Tactical Marines and part of the backbone of a Death Guard force. I’ve got another 40 or 50 of these guys sitting in boxes and one day they’ll take their place on the table. To me Mk III power armour is synonymous with the Death Guard Legion and it’ll form the majority of power armour in the army. I’ve combined elements from both the Tactical and Despoiler (pistol and chainsword) kits to keep a bit of variation in the squad. They’re all brutalist, faceless monsters but they still retain a bit of individuality. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Tactical Support Squad Hyrese of the 98th Century

These were the test models I’d built from the plastic Mk IV box and they turned out pretty well. Mk IV was the cutting edge of power armour at the time the Heresy broke out and while Horus did what he could to ensure his fellow traitors got the best of the best, I figured a raiding force like mine wouldn’t have too much of it on account of it being allocated to other, more important units. These guys are all magnetized so they can carry a full 5 spread of plasma or melta weapons (or volkite, if they ever bring it back and make it worth taking).

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Assault Squad Menaeth of the 144th Century

These guys are where my madness really began to set in. I didn’t really want to have Mk III Assault Marines as to me they seemed too heavy but Mk IV didn’t seem quite beefy enough. The solution was to use Destroyers, who had additional armour plating fixed to the front of their Mk IV suits. Problem here was they all came with twin bolt pistols and an empty holster on each hip. I had to shave off the holster on the sword arm side of each mini while trying to keep as much of the hip and ribbing intact as I could. Also because of the small overlap of the gauntlets over the wrists I couldn’t just cut a hand off. I ended up snipping them halfway down the hand and drilling out the rest before attaching a brand new hand and weapon. I already told you, I don’t have a problem. They turned out really fucking nicely though, which nearly makes up for the effort put in. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Heavy Support Squad Balor of the 92nd Century

Mk III dudes with lascannons, ready to kick ass and take names. Which is exactly why they’ll get targeted turn one and shot off the board. In 40k they either work to fill out a Devastator squad or to give a Tactical squad an excellent candidate for their squad rerolls thanks to Master Artisans.

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Heavy Support Squad Agon of the 98th Century

This was the other half of the plastic Mk IV Marines, with their weapons picked up from bits sites. I love the classic over the shoulder missile launchers which are lifted straight from Space Crusade and Rogue Trader. Some of the best things to come out of the range in my opinion. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Contemptor Dreadnought Vholerian of the 98th Century

Dreadnoughts own, and Contemptor Dreadnoughts own bones. I’ve always wanted one ever since they were first released back in the day and although I’ve had this guy for a couple of years I’ve only gotten around to painting him in the last month. Not only are the Contemptors great models the Legion variants of them are all fantastic (except the Iron Warriors one hah) and have a ton of character. I’m considering running a second regular one as a Mortis eventually, and can’t wait to make another one of these bastards. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Leviathan Dreadnought Khologon of the 92nd Century

The chonky boi himself, I bought and painted this guy way back in 2016, so nobody accuse me of hopping on the bandwagon! One of my favorite models, this guy is a fucking beast and after years of being over priced with middling rules he’s finally as intimidating on the tabletop as he should be. Threat saturation is the name of the game here, as opponents will do their best to avoid or ignore this 300+ point slab of resin. He can be a great source of pressure and used properly can be a colossal pain in the ass to deal with. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Predator of the 33rd Century

Ah the humble Predator. I’ve still got one of the old Second Edition Predators somewhere in the pile of detritus I call a work space, and have a soft spot for the older, more rounded design. Sponsons and main gun are magnetized to get the most mileage out of the kit, and I have a second sitting in a box waiting to join him. Usually I wouldn’t expect them to last very long but with my heavier Dreadnoughts making their way up field and being able to move and shoot with no penalty in Ultramarines Tactical Doctrine this little guy has pulled his weight in every game I’ve had with him. 

 

Credit: Adamantium_wang

Land Raider of the 92nd Century

My proudest tank and also the one that sees the table the least. Isn’t it always the way? I didn’t have the spare funds for a Mk IIB kit at the time so I tried to convert one into kind of a halfway point between the older and newer patterns. The lascannons are cut down from other sources and housed in the Hurricane bolter sponsons from a Storm Raven. This was then seated in a drilled-out sponson frame et voila. Not quite as wide and chunky as a regular Land Raider but still plays the part well. Maybe one day they’ll be good enough to take in a game of 40k?

 

The Future

At the moment I’m focused on finishing out the list above, which means finishing a pair of Rhinos, a jump Captain, a Techmarine and a Librarian. They’re all built and have paint on them but none of them are near what I consider finished. After that (if I don’t drift into finishing my Guard army) I’ve got a bunch of more esoteric models built that I’d like to have available to play with. I’ve a Deredeo looking on forlornly as all his cousins get finished and used, I’ve a pair of Apothecaries who are 90% done but will probably never see an actual game, a pair of Rapier batteries with gunners, an actual Mk IIb Land Raider, a Vindicator Laser Destroyer and Sicaran Venator (both excellent models that don’t quite carry their weight in game) and even a pair of Javelin grav speeders. These are all low priority but one day I hope to have them all done and maybe even do up an update article with everything finished. 

Well, that’s it. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tour of my plastic and resin toys and hope the realisation that you’ve just read six thousand words on space dollies doesn’t get you too down. Happy hamming!

 

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