How To Paint Everything: White Scars

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White Scars WIP 5 - Ghazk

In our How to Paint Everything series, we take a look at different armies of the Warhammer universe, examine their history and heraldry, and look at several different methods for painting them. In this installment, Jack is taking a look at the White Scars.

Who Are the White Scars?

Group of Primaris White Scars fight Word Bearers

Group of Primaris White Scars fight Word Bearers. Credit: Games Workshop

The White Scars are the First Founding Chapter created from the breakup of the Vth Legion at the end of the Horus Heresy. Never one of the biggest Legions, the White Scars spent the Great Crusade operating far away and alone. They spent little enough time at the sides of their brother Legions that neither loyalist nor traitor were confident of which side they would end up on during the Horus Heresy.

Unlike nearly every other Legion of Space Marines, who could best be likened to a hammer, the White Scars are a rapier, striking quickly and then withdrawing. The warriors of the White Scars favor mobile assaults, whether from the back of a bike, a Rhino, or an Impulsor. Unlike the Ultramarines, who plan everything to the finest detail, they eschew planning, flowing where the battle takes them. The White Scars have been described as the wind, everywhere and yet nowhere.

The White Scars were the third Loyalist Legion on Terra at the culmination of the Horus Heresy, fighting with the Imperial Fists and the Blood Angels to defend the Imperial Palace. Mounted on their bikes, the warriors of the Vth legion retook the Lion’s Gate spaceport from the Traitor forces, preventing resupply to the forces on the ground, and prompting the conflict on the Vengeful Spirit.

Where to Read More

Cover of Scars
The White Scars haven’t had very many books written about them, but fortunately what little has been written is great. Scars, written by Chris Wraight, is a fantastic story about the very beginning of the Heresy and the decisions the White Scars had to make while choosing their side, and The Path of Heaven, also by Chris Wraight, follows on with their path to Terra. Horus Heresy Book 8: Malevolence is a good journey into the history of the legion, and their campaign in the Chondax system.

Playing White Scars


The White Scars are a chapter that mostly follows the codex, though they like to move around quite a bit faster than the Ultramarines who wrote it. Their Chapter tactic allows them to fall back and still charge, which pairs very well with Shock Assault – even in multi-round combats you can continue to get the additional attack. In a pure White Scars army, Devastating Charge doubles up on this, adding +1D to all their attacks when they charge when in Assault Doctrine. An army of White Scars can expect to have some bikes, and likely a core of Intercessors with assault bolters advancing up the board before charging.

For more on getting your White Scars on the table, check out our review of the White Scars Codex Supplement.

Painting White Scars

White Scars are an incredibly vibrant mix of white armor and red iconography, which can lead to all sorts of fun cleaning up overspill. For all the difficulty painting them, they make for a truly striking army on the table. We’ve brought in two guest painters, Ghazk and OhDearGodNo, to talk about how they approached painting their army. Since we’re painting white, both our painters are using an airbrush. We find it to be the most reliable way to get a clean coat, though there’s nothing to say that you can’t get a great result out of rattlecans.

The Ghazk Way:

Ghazk is a local wizard who seems to show up to game night every few weeks with a brand new fully painted army, as well as some completed commission work for someone else at the store. Nobody is quite sure how he manages it.

Ghazk:

In early 2018 I set out to put together a 1000 point Zone Mortalis force of Horus Heresy era White Scars which I was attracted to because the chapter was rarely seen in the 30K community. The few White Scars armies you would see would almost always be the stereotypical flood of bikes and I wanted to do something unique.
I had read a bit of fluff talking about how while White Scar recruits from Chogoris embraced the Mongolian inspired style of warfare, there were also recruits from Terra that embraced a more traditional Astartes approach to warfare. I took this idea a step further and asked myself how un-White Scar can I design this army? I decided to include the heavier marks of armor, inducted cybernetica, plodding artillery, and most importantly, no bikes!
Having purchased an airbrush not long ago, I had heard that painting white and yellow becomes a lot more trivial. I did some experimentation and came up with a quick and effective process for painting white. It turned out so well that I decided to expand the Zone Mortalis force into a full blown 3000 point army. Here is my process for the white basecoat:

Step 1: Priming

White Scars WIP 1 - Ghazk

Credit: Ghazk

A simple coat of black primer! I shoot mine through my airbrush, but rattle can black works just as well in my experience.

Step 2: Cold Grey

White Scars WIP 2 - Ghazk

Credit: Ghazk

Next, I do what I call an 80% zenithal of Cold Grey. What I mean by 80% zenithal is that I spray from above, but I’ll roll the spray angle down to close to horizontal to cover about 80% of the model. You can only see black showing out from under the most extreme overhangs./

Step 3: Dead White

White Scars WIP 3 - Ghazk

Credit: Ghazk

This step is a more traditional zenithal. I’ll spray from directly above and roll down the sides only enough to get almost full coverage on the most exposed areas like the shoulder pads and head.

Step 4: Sponging Leadbelcher

White Scars WIP 4 - Ghazk

Credit: Ghazk

Finally, I’ll do a pretty generous sponging of Leadbelcher. Paying special attention to get any long sharp edges. This step really adds a lot of contrast to the white and brings out a lot of detail.

Finish: The rest of the details.

White Scars WIP 5 - Ghazk

Credit: Ghazk

The rest of the details are done in a traditional manner. Metallic trim is done with Leadbelcher followed by Nuln Oil and a silver drybrush highlight. The black weapons are done with Abaddon Black followed by a drybrushing of P3 Greatcoat Grey. Add a little red for flavor. Easy and effective!

The OhDearGodNo Method:

OhDearGodNo paints a slightly more traditional and brighter White Scars army, which looks truly fantastic. He does need to clean out his spray booth though.

OhDearGodNo:

Painting White Scars can be done many ways, and there are a lot of good resources out there that involve everything from the GW layer method to dipping and now contrast. This method will require an airbrush, so if you don’t have one I’d recommend looking at a different tutorial.

Below are the paints I use for an Intercessor. If the model has any brass ammo components showing, I will also use Vallejo Model Color Old Gold 70.878 and wash with Nuln Oil.

Vallejo Black Surface Primer 74.602
Vallejo Grey Surface Primer 74.691
Vallejo Model Air White Grey 71.119
Vallejo Model Air Chrome 71.064
Vallejo Mecha Varnish (matte) 69.702
Vallejo Model Color black 70.950
Vallejo Model Color Mahogany 70.846
Citadel Mephiston Red
Citadel Evil Sunz Scarlet
Citadel Iron Hands Steel (leadbelcher can be used as an alternative)
Citadel Mechanicus Standard Grey or Vallejo Medium Gunship Grey 71.097
Citadel Dark Reaper
Citadel Deathclaw Brown
Citadel Pallid Wych Flesh
Citadel Contrast Black Templar
Citadel Soulstone Blue
Citadel Carroburg Crimson (red wash)
Citadel Agrax Earthshade (brown wash)
Citadel Nuln Oil (black wash)
Citadel Drakenhof Nightshade (blue wash)

I also have a Mix of 60% Nuln Oil, 40% Drakenhof Nightshade, which is used for pinwashing (recess shading) the white.

White Scars WIP 1 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

I begin with a zenithal highlight using the Vallejo Surface Primer. Zenithal highlighting when priming is to use the lighter color more on areas that would be exposed to the light, and more of the darker primer on shaded or recessed areas.

White Scars WIP 2 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

The base coat is VMA White Grey. I found this to be the best looking temperature of white. It’s warmer than a ‘pure’ white, however not so much that it would begin to look more like a bone-ish color. For models that aren’t batch painted or require extra detail, it also gives a little room for edge highlighting.
I put on about 2-3 thin coats of the White Grey with an airbrush. You’ll notice with each coat the color temperature gets warmer, by the third coat the actual pigment for this color is apparent.
Let all these coats dry completely. I’d say a minimum of 30 minutes should pass between coats, and an hour for the last. After painting the base coat, seal it with a good varnish. I use Vallejo Mecha Matte, as it’s a little thicker and tougher than their standard formula. Do not skip this step. If you don’t seal the white, the minute you so much as breathe on the mini the paint will speckle and peel off. Make sure to cover the entire model. I let the varnish dry overnight before moving on to pinwashing.

White Scars WIP 3 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

Now begins the most daunting, frustrating, and time-consuming part of this process. Think of this as the equivalent of what a Raven Guard player must go through with edge highlighting, but the opposite. You want to use the 60/40 mix of Nuln/Drakenhof and using a detail brush, wash all the recesses. You’ll find that if you varnished correctly, much of the wash will fill the channels on its own. You can use enamels to pinwash as well, or if you can find a good hydrophobic varnish that can also help. The problem with going those routes are that sometimes you don’t want to lose control of the ink and that can happen if you make it too easy for it to run.

White Scars WIP 4 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

If you make any mistakes, just use some of the VMA White Grey to clean up where the lines are too thick, or if you got too handsy with some of the armor. Do everything possible to minimize these mistakes, as the coverup process will take about 3-4 thin coats, possibly more depending on the thickness of your mistake.
While not shown in this pic, make sure you shade the inside of the gorget as well as the outside border of the chest eagle. Do not bother pinwashing the eagle itself.

White Scars WIP 5 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

Something new for this, the old method I had for the bellows was to use Mechanicus Standard Grey and then wash it 2-3 times with Nuln Oil as a way to shade down. The traditional method is to use black and edge highlight with Citadel Eshin Grey, however it takes much longer and is more prone to the paint jumping from one ridge to the next. The good news is that with a white varnished base, you can apply two thin coats of Citadel Contrast Black and get the same effect. Neat. After you’re done, you may need to go back over the edges with the white to clean it up a bit.

White Scars WIP 6 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

Moving on to the red, I use Mephiston Red for a base and just be stupidly careful while I paint it. For the squad markings, I freehand them and they just really take a lot of practice. You’ll want to do the usual two thin coats, because even with a base color as strong as this, the white still will show through if you don’t.
After basecoating I wash the red with Carroburg Crimson, then re-apply Mephiston Red to the non-recessed feathers and the skull. After that I edge highlight with Evil Sunz Scarlet. You don’t need to do this part, but it really makes a huge difference.

White Scars WIP 7 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

White Scars WIP 8 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

This next section is fairly universal so I’m going to go over it quickly.
For the bolt rifle, I just paint it with VMC Black, and use Citadel Iron Warriors for the metal. You can use Leadbelcher, however since I’m going for a clean look, I prefer to have the metal just a little bit brighter. I edge highlight with Dark Reaper and not grey- This way the edge highlight contrasts not only with the black, but with the white as well. If I used something with a strictly neutral shade, it could end up blending in with the white behind it… making its entire purpose wasted.
Drill your barrels.

For leathers, I personally use VMC Mahogany with an Agrax wash and a Deathclaw Brown edge highlight. You can use contrast or whatever you’d like to be honest.

White Scars WIP 9 - OhDearGodNo

Credit: OhDearGodNo

For the eyes and weapon optics, I use VMA Chrome and apply it with a brush. The thinned chrome flows easier and minimizes completely fucking it up. After that I apply Soulstone Blue in the usual method.
Sometimes after this, you may want to go over and clean any white areas that shipped or had something mark it a bit. After that, varnish the model again, this time sealing everything together. For this last step I use Testor’s Dullcote. While insanely overpriced, it’s stupid good at protecting models.

The Richyp Way (Last minute panic approach)

48hrs before the scheduled date for this article someone spotted there were no White Scars done with a regular brush, so I rummaged through my bits box to mash up a White Scars looking marine.

Painting wise, while my intention was to do the white with Contrast paints, it didn’t work out as well as expected to I layered white over it. In hindsight Corax White primer would’ve probably worked a lot better, along with thinned Apocethary White instead of neat. Anyway….

Step 0

White Scars - Richyp - Step 0

Credit: Richyp

I started by priming the model in Wraithbone spray. As I mentioned above if i was to do this again I’d probably use Corax White instead, to reduce the number of layers of white in step 2.

Step 1

White Scars - Richyp - Step 1

Credit: Richyp

Cover the parts of the model that will end up white in Apothecary White Contrast paint. Like with all Contrast paints try and keep your brush strokes in the same general direction to help avoid streaking and pooling. Use the brush to soak up any puddles that form at the lower parts of the miniature. I also applied a mix of Darkoath Flesh Contrast Paint and Contrast Medium 1:1 to the face so the two colours could dry at the same time.

The base was washed in Athonian Camoshade.

If you use Corax White, I’d thin the Apothecary White about 1:1 with Contrast Medium at this point to take some of the greyness out of the paint.

Step 1.5

I wasn’t happy with how grey the result was so I did a test on a couple of armour panels using thinned Vallejo Model Colour (VMC) White…

White Scars - Richyp - Step 1.5

Credit: Richyp

You can see how much better a couple of very thin coats of VMC White worked, so that will lead to Step 2…

Step 2

White Scars - Richyp - Step 2

Credit: Richyp

Repeat what was done in Step 1.5 over the apothecary white, be prepared to do a lot of layers though. The image above was taken after about 4 layers of white and you can still see how blotchy his right leg is, but as I’m lazy we’ll just cover the area with some markings rather than do more layers of white.

Step 3

White Scars - Richyp - Step 3

Credit: Richyp

Using Blood Angels Red Contrast paint very carefully paint the red areas, taking even more care around the shoulder pad rims as it’s extremely annoying to have to fix up white paint without the temptation of covering mistakes with thicker paint to save time. Don’t worry too much about the streakiness of the markings, we’ll tidy that up later.

The metal areas were painted in VMA Gunmetal (thinned Leadbelcher would work fine).

Step 4 / Details stage

White Scars - Richyp - Step 4

Credit: Richyp

White Scars - Richyp - Step 4.1

Credit: Richyp

This stage is actually pretty quick but will make all the difference. For the hair/beard and any parts that are going to be black (pistol casing, sword, ribbing on armour etc..) mix some Abaddon Black with Contrast Medium (About 2:1) and wash over those areas (be carefull not to get it on the white or skin). Do the same in the eye sockets too.

After the eye sockets have dried, dot a bit of Wraithbone on either side to give you the pupil in the middle and some nice dark recesses.

For the red areas, paint a small edge highlight of Lugnath Orange. If you mess up the chest eagle, don’t panic, apply some Blood Angels Red or Carroberg Crimson over it and it’ll look great. I didn’t even bother trying to pick the feathers out, I just painted lines of orange over the outer 2 edges on each side and washed the whole thing to save time.

Tidy up any red areas with Evil Sunz Scarlet and draw any scribbles or markings with a fine brush.

Highlight the nose, ears and ridges around eyes with Kislev Flesh.

Finally using neat white, put a couple of spot highlights on the feet, around the top of the gorget, and on any other bits you want to make shine.

 

Wrapping Up

There you have it! Three different methods to paint your White Scars, all of which will give you a fantastic looking army. Check back on Monday for the next installment in How To Paint Everything – The Yncarne.

 

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